npr
npr:

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.
The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions and computers.
The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. For the other group, it was life as usual.
Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions and computers.

The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. For the other group, it was life as usual.

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

greatestgeneration

Home Front Friday: Knit Your Bit

Home Front Friday is a regular series that highlights the can do spirit on the Home Front during World War II and illustrates how that spirit is still alive today!

During World War II you might have had a friend ask you to help the soldiers out by picking up your needles and yarn and knitting your bit.  The Red Cross popularized the slogan as early as World War I and then revived it with propaganda, leaflets and campaigns to get people to knit for soldiers.

On the Home Front during World War II, knitting served as one more way Americans could support the war effort. The November 24, 1941, cover story of the popular weekly magazine Life explained “How To Knit.” Along with basic instructions and a pattern for a simple knitted vest, the article advised, “To the great American question ‘What can I do to help the war effort?’ the commonest answer yet found is ‘Knit.’” Thousands of Americans picked up their needles to knit socks, mufflers and sweaters to keep American soldiers warm and provide them with a handcrafted reminder of home.

The Red Cross supplied patterns for sweaters, socks, mufflers, fingerless mitts (which allowed soldiers to keep their hands warm while shooting), toe covers (for use with a cast), stump covers and other garments. Cold, wet, sore feet were the enemy as surely as German or Japanese troops.

“The Navy needs men, but it also needs knitters,” newspapers cried.  After the war, some knitters dropped their needles for good. Others kept on knitting throughout their lives in a wide variety of colors — any color, many swore, but Army-issued khaki or olive drab!  Today knitting is popular once again and many enjoy the process of creating something useful.  Luckily, the spirit of sharing is alive and well too.  The Museum has been fortunate enough to be the receiving ground for a great civic service project for the past 8 years, running our own “Knit Your Bit” campaign, so you can send in your hand-made scarves to be distributed to veterans around the country.

Want to get involved?

Learn more about how you can Knit Your Bit.

Sign up for our e-newsletter.

Join us for a Knit-in and keep that generous knitting spirit alive while thanking our veterans.

beingblog
The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence. To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns, to surrender to too many demands, to commit oneself to too many projects, to want to help everyone in everything is to succumb to violence. More than that, it is cooperation in violence. The frenzy of the activist…destroys his own inner capacity for peace. It destroys the fruitfulness of his own work, because it kills the root of inner wisdom which makes work fruitful.
Thomas Merton, as quoted in Courtney Martin’s weekly column for On Being, "The Spiritual Art of Saying No"
(via beingblog)

You say no so you can say yes. It’s sad in the way that all limitations are, but also liberating. You are human and finite and precious and fumbling. This is your one chance to spend your gifts, your attention, most importantly your love, on the things that matter most. Don’t screw it up by being sentimental about what could have been or delusional about your own capacity. Have the grace to acknowledge your own priorities. Prune and survive.

newyorker

The Borowitz Report: Nation Debates Extremely Complex Issue of Children Firing Military Weapons

newyorker:

“Much like the long-running national debates about jumping off a roof, licking electrical sockets, and gargling with thumbtacks, the vexing question of whether children should fire military weapons does not appear headed for a swift resolution.”

Read more: http://nyr.kr/YYouxn

Photograph by SVEN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty

But we’ve got some consensus: you can’t leave your child alone to play in the park, or in the car while you stand outside and smoke a cigarette.

So there’s that.

pointsnandfigures
So what does the 44-year-old chief executive want to talk about? “The main strength of Hermès is the love of craftsmanship” is the first thing he says in his accented but fluent English. Ten seconds later: “We see ourselves as creative craftsmen.” Thirty minutes in: “The philosophy of Hermès is to keep craftsmanship alive.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2014/08/20/inside-hermes-luxury-secret-empire/

Notice, it’s not to sell more stuff.  He correctly articulates the core values of the company in three sentences.  It’s their raison d’etre.  

(via pointsnandfigures)